Author: Paul Schroeder, April 8, 2020

Across the US, businesses, and agencies, and the communities and individuals they serve are struggling in countless ways to maintain well-being – physical, mental and economic. And, our political leaders are also struggling, with limited resources and levers to provide assistance and guidance. Recently enacted legislation has certainly helped and most agree that more action will be needed. In light of these unprecedented times, making our voices heard, on behalf of those we serve, those we employ and those we care for is more challenging than ever. Over the next several issues of Enews, we will try to keep you informed of developments and action needed regarding policy advocacy and provide resources here and on the website. Read on to see current threats to education, accessibility, and voting rights.

Threats to Education

As many are now aware, the recently enacted CARES Act included language directing the U.S. Secretary of Education, Betsy Devos, to report to Congress within 30 days to recommend any proposed waivers of rights and requirements outlined in the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) and Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act. It is obvious that flexibility may be needed concerning direct services and even materials production and distribution during this period of closures. However, the strength of IDEA is its individualized planning and services which allows parents and schools TO WORK TOGETHER.

Congress would likely have to approve any requested waiver of requirements and rights under IDEA or 504, but Congress needs to hear from those of us who have the responsibility to defend opportunities and uphold the rights of individuals we serve and support. To follow this issue, we recommend that you check with the Council of Parent Attorneys and Advocates (COPAA). In addition, VSA members ACB, AER, and AFB are also carefully monitoring this evolving situation and will doubtless have up-to-date information.

Protecting the Right to Vote

Likely many of you live in states that have delayed the political primary. As I write this, Wisconsin is going ahead with its primary election, despite serious concerns about the health of voters and staff at physical polling sites. Many states have increased mail-in or absentee voting for upcoming primaries (and other special elections). By next November, we may be again facing social distancing. Calls for increased mail-in voting will increase, and many in Congress have attempted to push legislation to provide support to states for this purpose. Without commenting on the politics of absentee voting, it is imperative that we make clear that individuals who are blind or low vision have the right to cast an independent and secure vote. ACB, and other advocacy organizations, are leading efforts to push Congress to ensure support for accessible absentee voting measures.

Let us know the policy issues on which you would like VSA or your colleagues to take action. And, we’ll be on the lookout for new legislative or regulatory efforts related to the COVID-19 pandemic.

How to contact your elected members of Congress:

Contact Info for Your Senators is here: https://www.senate.gov/general/contact_information/senators_cfm.cfm

Contact Info for Your House Member is here: https://www.house.gov/representatives/find-your-representative

And, contact Info for Your Governor is here: https://www.usa.gov/state-governor

The National Federation of the Blind National Convention is the largest gathering of blind people in the world.

Mom, two daughters, and dad of the Awa family pose for a photo during the carnival celebration at the 2019 National Convention in Las Vegas.

It is the premier event for training, support, and information for the blind community. It also serves as a governing body, democratically electing their leadership and establishing each year’s organizational priorities.

Although the convention is open to all, our constitution states that only members of the NFB have the right to participate in decision making when it comes to organizational policy.

July 14 – 19

Houston, TX

https://www.nfb.org/get-involved/national-convention

November 3 – 6, 2019 at the Georgian Terrace in Atlanta, GA 

St. Louis, Missouri – September, 2019 – Over 220 national leaders will convene in Atlanta, Georgia this fall for discussions on the future of providing services to people who are blind or have low vision. With more than 26.9 million[1] American adults in the US and 226 million[2] more around the world living with blindness and low vision, and  thousands more projected to join these ranks, this is an important national issue.

Event organizer VisionServe Alliance, an association for leaders of nonprofit agencies across the country and Canada, holds its conferences in various U.S. cities twice a year. This year’s Executive Leadership Conference in Atlanta will use some pretty amazing technological adaptions as part of its meeting to ensure the content is accessible to ALL attendees, regardless of their level of sight.

With an average of 15 percent of its meeting attendees themselves being blind or having low vision, VisionServe Alliance is used to employing standard accommodations to make its meetings accessible, like offering its materials digitally or in Braille, and offering tips and training on-site hospitality staff and featured speakers. But this year’s conference presents additional accessibility challenges because the meeting will employ a format called Open Space Technology, which allows participants to set their own discussion topics and attend multiple break out sessions throughout the day. While it’s exciting for the attendees to have control over the agenda, a flexible format presents challenges for visually impaired attendees to fully participate in the activities.

“Open Space creates the possibility for amazing deep dive conversations about the challenges that face our field and the opportunities to innovate our practice,” says David Morgan, President & CEO Future In Sight in Concord, N.H., who is co-facilitating the event.

VSA plans to provide conference attendees access to additional resources from companies on the forefront of vision technology: OrCam’s MyEye, a tiny camera device that fits on the of a pair of eyeglasses and can read aloud any printed material; Aira’s  Horizon Kit including their Smart Glasses that transmit the wearer’s images to a representative who then offers assistance in real time to navigate buildings, streets, airports, stores, etc.; and Vispero’s popular screen reading software called JAWS that allows blind and visually impaired users to navigate the world wide web using audible descriptions of menus and images. Many other companies will be on hand exhibiting and demonstrating the latest tools for accessibility to people who are blind and visually impaired. Volunteers from local vision rehabilitation agency, the Center for the Visually Impaired in Atlanta will also be on-site to provide assistance.

“We want this year’s conference to provide learning exchanges to engage a wider array of current and emerging leaders across sectors, disciplines, demographics, and industry segments including education, rehabilitation, employment, medical, technology and social services for people of all ages,” says President and CEO of VisionServe Alliance, Lee Nasehi. “We are also proud to have the support of other national organizations in the field behind this year’s event.” Co-Hosts of the VisionServe Alliance Executive Leadership Conference include ACB (American Council of the Blind)ACVREP (Academy for Certification of Vision Rehabilitation & Education Professionals), AER (Association for Education and Rehabilitation of the Blind and Visually Impaired), AFB (American Foundation for the Blind), APH (American Printing House f/t Blind), BVA (Blinded Veterans Association), COSB (Council of Schools and Services for the Blind) CVI Atlanta (Center for the Blind and Visually Impaired – Atlanta), NAEPB (National Association for the Employment of People Who Are Blind)NIB (National Industries for the Blind)NOAH (National Organization for Albinism and Hypopigmentation) , NRTC (National Research and Training Center on Blindness and Low Vision), Prevent Blindness, and USABA (United States Association of Blind Athletes).

Kathleen Zeider, President/CEO of ACVREP notes that, “VisionServe Alliance is uniquely positioned to convene this important summit in our field. We are excited that it will refine the collective focus and strengthen the collaboration in our field resulting in a greater impact for those we serve.”

Mike McGowan, Executive Director of NOAH, said his organization, “enthusiastically supports the efforts of VisionServe Alliance to gather the field together to discover ways to build a better world for people who are blind or have low vision. There is no limit to what we can accomplish when we work together.”

Participants at the VSA Executive Leadership Conference will ask, discuss, and suggest solutions to the biggest challenges in the field of blindness & low vision such as:

  • What can be done to assure access to all digital information including government websites, applications and voting processes?
  • Are public and private education resources meeting the needs of students?
  • What are the emerging challenges and solutions in employment?
  • How can we significantly enhance the resources for training and support for seniors?
  • How can we improve care for our veterans through partnerships with the private sector?

Co-facilitators include David Morgan, President & CEO of Future In Sight, Lee Nasehi, President & CEO of VisionServe Alliance, and John Mitchell, President/CEO of the Cincinnati Association for the Blind and Board Chair of VisionServe Alliance.

For more information and to register, go to www.visionserveallinace.org/conferences/

About VisionServe Alliance:

VisionServe Alliance is a consortium of Executive Directors/CEOs of 501(c)(3) nonprofits throughout the United States that provide unique and specialized services to people who are blind or with severe vision loss. We bring together the full diversity of services for one conversation with the ultimate goal of unifying the many issues and organizations operating independently of one another in the field. Members include organizations focusing on national advocacy and/or service issues, employment and manufacturing, adult vision rehabilitation, K-12 residential and on-line schools, early intervention and pre-school, dog guides, low vision clinics, and Braille production. Collaborative projects, national trends, stronger management and leadership, and advocacy issues have been born from these conversations and activities including the formation of the Aging and Vision Loss National Coalition, a consortium of leaders comprised from 19 national, state, local, private and public agencies with the goal of advocating for equal access and quality of life for older Americans with vision loss.

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[1] According to the American Foundation for the Blind. See https://www.afb.org/research-and-initiatives/statistics/adults

[2] According to the International Agency for the Prevention of Blindness. See https://www.iapb.org/advocacy/world-sight-day/

November 3 – 6, 2019 at the Georgian Terrace in Atlanta, GA

St. Louis, Missouri – July 24, 2019 – Join us this fall at the VisionServe Alliance Executive Leadership Conference—a new kind of conference designed to foster participant involvement and spark creativity. All leaders involved in the provision of service to or with people who are blind or have low vision are invited to attend and participate.

This year’s conference will use the Open Space Technology meeting format, a format different from our typical conferences in that participants will be the ones to generate the program and structure the schedule for each day, encouraging conversation, planning, and action on a wide range of topics and initiatives that will impact the future of blindness and low vision.

All stakeholders and leaders in the blind and low vision field are invited. “We wanted this year’s conference to provide learning exchanges to engage a wider array of current and emerging leaders across sectors, disciplines, demographics, and industry segments including education, rehabilitation, employment, medical, technology and social services for people of all ages,” says President and CEO of VisionServe Alliance, Lee Nasehi. “We are also proud to have the support of other national organizations in the field behind this year’s event.” Co-Hosts of the VisionServe Alliance Executive Leadership Conference include ACB (American Council of the Blind), ACVREP (Academy for Certification of Vision Rehabilitation & Education Professionals), COSB (Council of Schools and Services for the Blind) NAEPB (National Association for the Employment of People Who Are Blind) and NOAH (National Organization for Albinism and Hypopigmentation).

Kathleen Zeider, President/CEO of ACVREP notes that, “VisionServe Alliance is uniquely positioned to convene this important summit in our field. We are excited that it will refine the collective focus and strengthen the collaboration in our field resulting in a greater impact for those we serve.”

Mike McGowan, Executive Director of NOAH, said his organization, “enthusiastically supports the efforts of VisionServe Alliance to gather the field together to discover ways to build a better world for people who are blind or have low vision.  There is no limit to what we can accomplish when we work together.”

There are more than 26.9 million[1] American adults in the US and 226 million[2] more around the world living with blindness and low vision, with thousands more projected to join these ranks, all of whom have a vested interest in dramatically enhancing education, services, transportation, digital accessibility, employment and other opportunities.

Participants at the VSA Executive Leadership Conference will seek to ask, discuss, and suggest solutions to challenges in the field of blindness & low vision that might include essential questions such as:

  • Are public and private education resources meeting the needs of students?
  • What are the emerging challenges and solutions in employment?
  • How can we significantly enhance the resources for training and support for seniors?
  • How can we improve care for our veterans through care partnerships with the private sector?
  • What can be done to assure access to all digital information including government websites, applications and voting processes?

This event is convened by Lee Nasehi, President & CEO of VisionServe Alliance, and John Mitchell, President/CEO of the Cincinnati Association for the Blind, Board Chair of VisionServe Alliance. Co-facilitators include David Morgan, President & CEO of Future In Sight, Lee Nasehi, and VSA Board of Directors in a variety of small and large group conversations with participants.

For more information and to register, go to www.visionserveallinace.org/conferences/

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[1] According to the American Foundation for the Blind. See https://www.afb.org/research-and-initiatives/statistics/adults

[2] According to the International Agency for the Prevention of Blindness. See https://www.iapb.org/advocacy/world-sight-day/

by David Ekin, President, St. Louis Society for the Blind and Visually Impaired

VisionServe Alliance:

  • Is the only organization focused on CEOs/Executive Directors to create learning, networking, and leadership opportunities.
  • Represents the entire range of services in the field of blindness/low vision – babies/parents, pre-school age, school age, transition age, working adults, older adults, through rehabilitation centers, low vision clinics, residential schools, manufacturing/service centers, guide dog schools, braille producers, and national advocacy/support organizations.
  • Promotes a stronger more unfied voice nationally by initiating legislation, coordinating responses to legislation, developing position statements, and promoting advocacy on a variety of issues important in the field.
  • Provides stronger and more regular communication across the blindness/low vision sector, and beyond our immediate sector, to the medical, educational, and research communities
  • Facilitates several professional development opportunities in leadership, management, fundraising, and advocacy
  • Reduces the cost of membership by off-setting dues in cost-savings provided by corporate group purchasing opportunities
  • Coordinates collaborative opportunities between members to share program models, vendor information, policies, resources, and more

I am continually asked to participate and be active in other national organizations, in coalitions, position statements, etc.  As a busy executive, I don’t have time to belong to a number of organizations, nor do we have the money to pay multiple membership dues.  I invest in my membership in VisionServe Alliance, and will continue to do so, because this organization not only focuses on making me a better leader through professional development and networking opportunities, but it focuses on the field of blindness and low vision which is integral to meeting my agency’s mission.

Roxann Mayros headshotby Roxann Mayros, CEO of VisionServe Alliance

  1. The field of blindness and low vision rehabilitation is under tremendous strain and undergoing tremendous change due to the increase in seniors seeking services, changes in demographics, the entry of occupational therapists as service providers, lack of third party reimbursement, changes within the Ability One program, and more. If we do not change our business models and service delivery programs, we will go out of business – sooner rather than later.
  2. The nonprofit service providers (VisionServe Alliance members) will be impacted by the federal Tax Cuts and Jobs Act, enacted in late 2017, which contains sweeping changes for individuals, corporations, and for the work of charitable nonprofits. The changes create immediate uncertainty about what nonprofits will need to do (sooner rather than later) to comply and what changes state and local governments will make in response – such as changing their own tax codes and making spending cuts.
  3. Our future clients will have vastly different needs than today’s. We all know the numbers – 10,000 Baby Boomers are turning 65 every single day, leading to upwards of 15.8 million Baby Boomers who will need vision rehabilitation services over the next few years. These folks will look very different from the clients we have been serving.  They are younger acting, healthier, technologically connected, and will need to work in their later years due to the degeneration of the pension system and low rate of savings.  Baby Boomers will not patiently wait, nor will they want to learn how to pour a cup of coffee or make a grilled cheese sandwich.  Instead, they will say, “I’ll figure that stuff out – teach me how to use my I-Pad so I can Facetime with my grandchildren.”  Or, “I need technology first so I can continue to read.”  Or, “I need to see better.”  Traditional vision rehabilitation programs must change and modernize or non-traditional vision rehabilitation providers (Ots, etc.) will be the primary source for services sooner rather than later.
  4. There is less Government (Federal, state, local) funding for vision rehabilitation, employment programs, university education programs, and less government purchasing from our production agencies. This is, and will in the future, impacting the success of our current business models.
  5. This field needs to talk and collaborate. Silos must come down.  Right now, schools for the blind function separate from adult rehabilitation organizations, and they function separate from manufacturing/service organizations, and they function separate from State services, and they function separate from the Veterans Administration, and they all function separate from the medical community … and on and on and on.
  6. We need more trained and educated vision rehabilitation professionals. VisionServe Alliance members together employ more VRTs and O & Mers than the Veteran’s Administration and State governments together.  If we do not create more vision specific professionals, then generalists will take over.  Fact:  There are 200,000+ occupational therapists in the United States.  There are 4,172+ ACVREP certified vision rehabilitation professionals (668 CVRTs, 493 CLVTs, 2,936 COMS, 75 CATIS and 19 who recently passed an exam).  Even though these numbers continue to increase, I think you can see the disparity in potential service providers.
  7. This field must develop evidence based practices that are commonly used, and we must begin to collect and disseminate common data. Every VisionServe Alliance member has anecdotal stories and agency specific data attesting to the success of individual programs (basically comparing ourselves to ourselves), but what we can’t do, is prove to funders and others how successful our individual programs are in comparison to other programs nationally, nor can we prove that specialized services produce better outcomes than generalized services.
  8. We have a lot of “Lone Rangers” out there. Many VisionServe Alliance members are developing protocols for outcomes and assessments, teaching vision courses to OT’s, and participating in research – within their own vacuum. Generally, VisionServe Alliance members are not sharing procedures or data, and they are not forming collaborations within the field.
  9. Networking CEO to CEO is an important benefit of membership, but so are those benefits that put money in our members’ “pockets” – especially now. By participating in the Mutual of America benefit alone, you could save more than you are spending on dues.
  10. VisionServe Alliance needs to continue to grow because what we do together is needed and important. We are the only organization in the field that has representatives from all vision rehabilitation disciplines!  VisionServe Alliance is the closest there is to a “Mother Ship” in this field.  We need to use this network for the betterment of our field and individual services to the people we serve.

 

Roxann Mayros headshotBy Roxann Mayros, CEO, VisionServe Alliance

People who choose to work at non-profits are generally touchy/feely people.  I know, because I’m one of them.  I think we’ve chosen to work in a helping profession because of the innate kindness within us. We greet each other at meetings and conferences with a hug instead of a handshake.  It’s not unusual to thank an employee for something special with a squeeze of the shoulder or hug.  We also have a tendency to (appropriately) touch each other while talking, or when we are making a point.  It is not unusual for nonprofit employees to hug a client/patient struggling with vision loss as a way to comfort and guide them to solutions through vision rehabilitation; or to hold a crying mother or father after their pediatrician has told them their baby will never see.

Are comforting hugs or a quick squeeze of the shoulders sexual harassment?  Is telling a naughty joke, sexual harassment?  As professionals in the caregiving profession, we usually mean no harm, but what may appear harmless to one person, could be uncomfortable, or even threatening, to another.  In addition to personal harm, nonprofit organizations could also be harmed as even the rumor of harassment could lead to the loss of major donor dollars, constituent support, valuable employees, or board members.

According to data from an ABC News/Washington Post poll, one in four women and one in 10 men report experiencing sexual harassment in the U.S. workplace. However, only 25 to 33 percent of those harassed at work actually report it. Even if you don’t think your nonprofit has a harassment problem, it is entirely possible that members of your staff have experienced harassment and felt unable or unwilling to speak up.

It should be clear from these statistics, that your organization must not only prepare to handle cases of harassment, if and when they occur, but also proactively work to prevent harassment from happening in the first place. It is important to take action now, not just because the reputation of your organization could be on the line, but because it is simply the right thing to do.

So, what is harassment? The Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) defines harassment as a form of employment discrimination and as “unwelcome conduct that is based on race, color, religion, sex (including pregnancy), national origin, age (40 or older), disability or genetic information.” State laws may broaden that definition.

Employees aren’t the only parties you need to think about when working to address harassment.  Adults and children receiving services are vulnerable, and may or may not, interpret comfort as harassment.  Volunteers have the right to sue a nonprofit if they’ve experienced harassment while working with your organization, as do board members.

Alicia Schoshinski of the Nonprofit HR Blog offers the following recommendations so that you can begin to create a culture where harassment is not perpetrated, tolerated, or ignored.

  1. Identify your organization’s values and adhere to them

Revisit your organization’s mission and the core values that will attract and retain the talent you need to drive that mission forward. Does your organization value work ethic? Transparency? Equality? Respect? Do your employees and volunteers know that succeeding at your organization means adhering to those values at all times? Or is there a disconnect between the values your organization says it stands for and those exemplified by management and staff?  A cultural needs assessment can help leadership identify whether your workforce understands and is acting on your organization’s core values, especially those that dissuade unwelcome verbal or physical conduct. If gaps between values and behaviors are identified, a cultural needs assessment can also help you identify steps to build a safer and more respectful culture for all.

  1. Create a clear policy about what is and is not accepted in the workplace

Without a clear anti-harassment policy, employees may not fully understand how to report harassment incidents, what they can expect once workplace harassment is reported, or even whether an incident someone experienced was truly harassment.  Your organization’s anti-harassment policy should seek to eliminate confusion and protect those who report what they perceive as harassment. To ensure serious offenses are not written off as mere annoyances, your organization’s official anti-harassment policy should define what constitutes harassment, the individuals and conduct covered by the policy, how to report an incident of harassment, how employees will be protected from retaliation and how perpetrators will be disciplined and/or terminated, should that be the appropriate course of action.  SHRM offers a sample anti-harassment policy your HR team can look to when drafting a policy for your organization, and Nonprofit HR’s Project-Based Consulting practice can also help you develop a policy tailored to the specific needs of your organization.

  1. Put harassment reporting systems in place for staff, volunteers, and board members

Harassment can be just as prevalent among boards and volunteers as it is among staff. Each of these groups must be aware of your anti-harassment policy and of the procedures for reporting instances of harassment.

Reporting processes vary from organization to organization, but most nonprofits ask victims of harassment to discuss complaints with their immediate supervisor, who will then report it to the HR department or to the Executive Director. At most workplaces, victims can also directly report incidences to HR. Then, the HR team, or the designated representative must thoroughly investigate the report and recommend any necessary consequences. The reporting process should involve thorough documentation and record keeping at all phases, as well as communication with the alleged harasser and the harassed about what to expect as the process moves forward.

Often, victims feel nervous or embarrassed about reporting workplace harassment, even to an objective third party like HR. To ensure that all employees––even those who are uncomfortable openly coming forward––are encouraged to speak up, consider implementing a simple, anonymous reporting tool like MySafeWorkplace or AllVoices.

Additionally, as Nonprofit HR CEO Lisa Brown Alexander noted in a recent interview with NPR on the topic of sexual harassment, organizations can consider utilizing an outsourced HR department to handle reports of harassment. Hiring an outside HR or law firm to investigate reports as a neutral third party can often improve staff trust in the process.

  1. Train managers in how to properly deal with reports of harassment

Once reports are made, your managers and leaders must follow up with HR or the Executive director, who must thoroughly investigate and take appropriate action to reprimand perpetrators. Consequences can vary, and they will depend on the results of the investigation following a report of a harassment. If an individual has committed an unprofessional or disrespectful act that does not constitute unlawful harassment, the individual may be counseled, suspended, or given a probationary period. If an individual is found to have committed unlawful harassment, the likeliest outcome is termination or forced resignation. Managers and other senior staff should be trained and counseled on how to manage employees who are facing disciplinary action for harassment but have not yet been terminated.

HR has both a professional and ethical obligation to remain impartial and take an active role in ensuring managers don’t question a victim’s report, make assumptions or punish the victim in any way for speaking up.

  1. Train staff and volunteers in harassment prevention, including bystander intervention

Make it clear that everyone is responsible for preventing harassment in the workplace, and encourage staff to speak up if they recognize a problem, even if the behavior is not directed toward them. To ensure members of your team do not feel discouraged from reporting secondhand instances of harassment, emphasize both confidentiality and the importance of protecting fellow team members.  We recommend providing mandatory workplace harassment training for every single employee. Nonprofit HR offers a course designed to help nonprofits like yours bolster anti-harassment policies and properly address reports of harassment in the workplace. In this course, we discuss what a civil workplace looks like, how to achieve workplace stability and any legal and compliance obligations related to harassment.”

We welcome your comments and input about this important topic.

 

 

 

 

 

Roxann Mayros headshotBy Roxann Mayros, CEO, VisionServe Alliance

VisionServe Alliance is a rich, vibrant network of non-profit leaders from throughout the United States, and now Canada, that provide specialized services to people with vision loss.  Our mission and daily focus is to bring together the full diversity of services provided to people of all ages with vision loss for important conversations and collaborations.  Members include organizations focused on these services:

Services offered by our members

Why is this important?  Because VisionServe Alliance is bringing down traditional service solos where educators only talked to educators or employers only talked to employers, with the ultimate goal of unifying the many issues and organizations operating independently of one another in the field.  Just one example is how those who serve the babies and toddlers learn from those who serve school age or young working adults the skills that need to be developed early on to successfully navigate growing up without sight. Over the last several decades, we have seen collaborative projects, national trends, stronger management and leadership, and advocacy issues born from the many conversations and activities VisionServe Alliance facilitates.

The scope and diversity of services to people with vision loss are keys to our strengths.  Our member organizations are working to improve lives and communities in countless ways all over the country, with specialties and missions that respond to every kind of need at all levels of society. VisionServe Alliance members come from 37 States, the District of Columbia, and Canada.

The features that distinguish us – our spectrum of talents, missions, and nationwide view – are much of what make the nonprofit service providers an unparalleled force for progress and social cohesion.  Just as important is the characteristic that VisionServe Alliance’s 100+ members share a fundamental, collective commitment to the public good, to generosity and voluntary effort.

Yet, for the things we have in common, for our unifying values and common needs, it’s essential to have an organization that stands for the whole.  This is VisionServe Alliance’s mission!

So, welcome to the first article in what will be an ongoing series about VisionServe Alliance members, what they are doing, how they are working together, and VisionServe Alliance’s role in facilitating these conversations, acting as a collaborative matchmaker, and our continuing pursuit of leadership excellence within our membership by providing high-level learning opportunities, policy updates, networking, and knowledge-sharing.  We welcome your contributions and comments.

Click HERE to read Roxann’s bio.