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Session 1: State of Vision Rehabilitation Services in the Age of Covid 19

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Session 2: State of Vision Rehabilitation Services in the Age of Covid 19

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Session 3: State of Vision Rehabilitation Services in the Age of Covid 19

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Session 4: State of Vision Rehabilitation Services in the Age of Covid 19

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Session 5: State of Vision Rehabilitation Services in the Age of Covid 19

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Session 10: State of Vision Rehabilitation Services in the Age of Covid 19

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Microsoft Accessibility: State of Vision Rehab Session 13

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TIPS FOR CARING FOR PATIENTS WHO ARE BLIND OR VISUALLY IMPAIRED

  • Ask how your patients want materials (recorded, large print [18-point type], via e-mail, etc.). Also, figure out a system that works for the patient to mark medications. For example, have the pharmacist put three rubber bands on a bottle of pills that should be taken three times a day.
  • Always read aloud what you write in the medical record.
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Interacting With Children Who Are Visually Impaired

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HOTEL & RESTAURANT TIPS FOR ASSISTING THOSE WHO ARE BLIND

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Do’s and Don’ts for Meeting Minutes

With many things in life and business, less is more.  In the nonprofit world, this is especially true for meeting minutes.  

Minutes are an official record of actions the board or committee took at a meeting, not a record of everything that was said.  They serve a historical purpose, but just as important, they serve a legal purpose, documenting the group’s adherence to the proper procedures and the nonprofit’s bylaws.  And minutes and recordings made during a meeting are discoverable in litigation, so it is imperative to be prudent about what you include.  

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KB Test Post

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AVLNC Awareness Campaign Resources

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Aging and Vision Loss Three Year Plan

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Dean VanNasdale, OD, PhD Bio

Dean VanNasdale, OD, PhD, received his Doctor of Optometry degree from the Michigan College of Optometry at Ferris State University in 2003 and completed a cornea and contact lens residency at Indiana University in 2004. He received a Master of Science degree in Clinical Research and a PhD degree in Vision Science from Indiana University in 2011.

Dean VanNasdale headshot
A.J Zanyk Photography 2014

Dr. VanNasdale has a research focus in population health data analysis.  Using multiple, complementary datasets, he studies associations between health determinants and vision impairment on a local, county, state, and national scale.  The goal of this research is to improve insight into the underlying cause of vision impairment, identify common co-morbid conditions, and educate stakeholders on the magnitude of vision impairment.  This analysis helps quantify the impact of vision impairment, identify areas where resources are needed to reduce vision impairment, and inform policy development. 

Dr. VanNasdale also has a research focus in advanced retinal imaging and visual function, with an emphasis on normal aging changes and pathological changes associated with diabetic retinopathy, age-related macular degeneration, and traumatic brain injury.  Using specific light/tissue interactions, he studies novel biomarkers for sight threatening disease and identifies changes to the normally well-ordered retinal structure. The goal of this research is to distinguish normal aging changes from those related to sight-threatening pathology and to detect retinal damage earlier in the disease process, using both commercially available and laboratory-based instruments.

Dr. VanNasdale teaches Public Health and Environmental Vision to third year optometry students and is an instructor in the Contact Lens Services at Ohio State’s College of Optometry, where he also studies visual performance and complications associated with contact lens wear.  He holds leadership roles in academic and health advocacy organizations at the local, state, and national level.  In 2019, he was the recipient of the Outstanding Project Award by the Vision Care Section of the American Public Health Association Vision Care Section and in 2020 was the Distinguished Service Award recipient. 

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Lou Moneymaker Receives Lifetime Achievement Award

Lou was present with the Lifetime Achievement Award at the VisionServe 2019 conference in Atlanta

Lou presented with the Lifetime Achievement Award by Lee Nasehi and John Mitchell during the Atlanta conferences

Lou Moneymaker, former President of BOSMA Enterprises

Lou Moneymaker has dedicated his life to service. For 50 years, Lou has worked to create equal opportunities and independence for people who are blind or visually impaired. His passion is evidenced by his work and service to many organizations to empower people experiencing vision loss.

His career began at the Indiana School for the Blind and Visually Impaired (ISBVI) where he was a teacher and a coach. Over his tenure, he also served in several leadership positions. As a track and field and wrestling coach, he fostered students’ abilities and their confidence until they believed they could accomplish anything they put their minds to. After 33 years, Lou retired from education.

In 2001, a career change was presented to Lou. He left ISBVI but did not leave his service to people who are blind or visually impaired. He became the president and CEO of Bosma Enterprises. Under his leadership, Bosma has undergone explosive growth from a $2 million to a $70 million company. To date, Bosma is Indiana’s largest employer of people who are blind or visually impaired. Under Lou’s direction, the company positioned itself as a national leader in the field of employment of people with vision loss by becoming the first not-for-profit in the country to build a fully-integrated, end-to-end business system on the Salesforce platform that is accessible to a person with vision loss. The new system allows a person who is blind to work in any position throughout the company and opens opportunities that may not have been available before.

Improving the Workplace

Additionally, under Lou’s leadership, Bosma Enterprises moved into a brand-new state-of-the-art headquarters that was designed to be accessible. His leadership has also allowed for the growth of Bosma’s programs and the development of the Center of Visionary Solutions for the Blind, a new facility that increases space for programs and expands training of people who are blind. His entrepreneurial spirit has permeated the organization which has challenged every employee to look for new ways to grow the business and to further Bosma’s mission to create opportunities for people who are blind or visually impaired.

His commitment to serving others does not stop at his work. In 1976, Lou, along with three other leaders saw an opportunity to create more opportunities for athletes who were blind. During the 1976 Olympics for the Disabled (renamed the Paralympics in 1988), the first to include athletes who were blind, this small group noticed nearly every other participating country had an organization for the development of athletes with vision loss. This group went on to found the United States Association of Blind Athletes (USABA). Lou was named the first vice president of the USABA and continues to serve and support the organization in many ways.

Lou Moneymaker’s devotion to students, athletes and employees have been critical to dispel the stereotypes surrounding people with disabilities. Lou has brought an innovative and entrepreneurial approach to creating opportunities for people who are blind or visually impaired.